About

 

Amardeep Shergill is a Canberra based emerging artist. Her art practice consists of two separate modes of art making.

She often explores multiple themes, directly related to ideas of familial cultural connections, identity, transmigration, complexities and triumphs of belonging to multiple spatial environments.

 Her art practice involves working with photographs to create large scale photomontages that explore the notion of Liminality. Photographs that have been taken on recent and old travels are fabricated digitally to create familiar and unfamiliar narratives from different places. These narratives depict varied dreamlike states where perplexing environments are juxtaposed together to create another reality. 

 Amardeep’s first Solo exhibition at M16 Artspace in June 2017 explored the notion of identity shaped by environment through ‘liminality’. The digital photomontages depicted varied urban and natural environments of different places that the artist had lived in or been to. Each work explored narratives through colourful elements juxtaposed together and often female figure (s) situated within in the middle of the work. 

 Second part of Shergill’s art practice involves looking at the possibility of re-interpretation of heritage through new materials and exploring familial connections and traditional craft making skills. In 2015, after hearing a story of her great-grandmother’s brilliance of skills in embroidery called 'Phulkari', Amardeep began to explore the possibility of re-interpreting this tradition and traditional craft form. 

 A surviving phulkari of her great-grandmother Dhan Kaur became source of inspiration to create sculptural form in 2018. The artworks are created using perforated mesh and DMC embroidery thread. The sculptural forms attempt to build knowledge from traditional objects and exploring potential of material that is unconventional for the traditional technique and context. 

 Shergill’s artworks explore (but are not limited to) world from women centric viewpoints. Culture and how it shapes Indian feminine identity brings a sense of inquiry that she continues to explore in art. 

 

 

Amardeep Shergill at her studio at Strathnairn Arts Canberra

Amardeep Shergill at her studio at Strathnairn Arts Canberra

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